But nobody’s writing about the root causes. Nobody’s writing about the Burenwurst.

And you read in the newspapers about how dangerous it is out in Schöpwerk, because of the crack, or whatever that junk’s called that makes people so hot-blooded—makes them cut off your head. But nobody’s writing about the root causes. Nobody’s writing about the Burenwurst. Because eating a Burenwurst’ll make you so aggressive, you won’t hardly believe it. On the sausage spectrum, Käsekrainer, Zigeuner, Cabanossi, they’ll all make you aggressive, too, but on a fundamental level, they own’t make you anywhere near as aggressive as a hot Burenwurst, except, of course, for a hot Leberkäse. 

from Come, Sweet Death!, by Wolf Haas, translated by Annie Janusch

10 song shuffle

Uh, Warm & Punchy tagged me a couple of weeks ago in some kind of internet game where, as best as I can tell, I’ve gotta post 10 tracks that show up on my shuffle. Guess I haven’t logged in to Tumblr in a while. Funny thing, up until about two weeks ago, I’d been totally without any kind of personal music listening device. My iPod crapped out around New Year’s, and my phone just wasn’t up to the task of holding music AND hot dog photos. I had to make a choice and I chose hot dogs. 

But a month or so ago, my phone crapped out (possibly from spending most of the summer at the beach/pool/park; water, sand, sunscreen, mustard, etc—not good for electronics). I got a new device that gives me access to music again so, la-de-da. Thing is, I haven’t downloaded that much onto the device yet, so this shuffle list is just, well, it’s not drawn from a huge pool of music. It’s, uh, probably overwhelmingly DADROCK, because, you know, hell, I don’t need to apologize or prevaricate. 

1. “Saddle in the Rain (Live)" - John Prine (from In Person & On Stage

2. “I Love Everybody" - Lyle Lovett 

3. “The Magic" - Joan As Policewoman 

4. “Slow Numbers" - Morphine 

5. “My Hometown" - Zoobombs 

6. “Up the Junction" - Squeeze

7. “Let Me Let You Down" - Mudhoney 

8. “Detroit Has a Skyline" - Superchunk 

9. “Saddle in the Rain" - John Prine (from Common Sense) -NO APOLOGIES

10. “What Goes On (Live)" - Velvet Underground 

There’s not much on here that wouldn’t have been on my iPod as a 15-yr-old. I want to say, too, that the music I’ve put on my device all speaks to my current (neverending) writing project in some way. 

For my part, I’ll tag TomBCN, HipFlaskAdventures, and Inconvenient Ruth

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comicsblogg:

image

Superman’s Girl Friend, Lois Lane #4 (1958)
Written by Otto Binder
Art by Kurt Schaffenberger

Superman cakewalking along a lightning bolt.

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vintagecrimeblacklizard:

On this day in 1989 Georges Simenon died at the age of eighty-six. Most accounts of Simenon’s writing life begin with the numbers: some 500 books published, seventy-five novels and twenty-eight short stories in the world-famous Inspector Maigret series, a daily output sometimes as high as eighty pages, total sales sometimes figured as high as 1.5 billion. Source: http://ow.ly/B4TUc

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dirtyriver:

Ross MacDonald : The moving Target, ill. Harvey Kidder

dirtyriver:

Ross MacDonald : The moving Target, ill. Harvey Kidder

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literarygoon:

"I won’t even talk to young writers anymore unless they can give me a good reason. I say, “I don’t have any time to talk to you unless you intend to give your entire life over to it, because it can’t be done otherwise.”-Jim Harrisonvia Esquire

That picture. Amazing.

literarygoon:

"I won’t even talk to young writers anymore unless they can give me a good reason. I say, “I don’t have any time to talk to you unless you intend to give your entire life over to it, because it can’t be done otherwise.”

-Jim Harrison

via Esquire

That picture. Amazing.

2 notes

vintagecrimeblacklizard:

On this day in 1909 Chester Himes was born in Jefferson City, Missouri.

“It seemed so illogical to punish some poor criminal for doing something that civilization taught him how to do so he could have something that civilization taught him how to want. It seemed to him as wrong as if they had hung the gun that shot the man.”
Chester Himes, Yesterday Will Make You Cry

Chester (Bomar) Himes began his writing career while serving in the Ohio State Penitentiary for armed robbery from 1929 - 1936. His account of the horrific 1930 Penitentiary fire that killed over three hundred men appeared in Esquire in 1932 and from this Himes was able to get other work published. From his first novel, If He Hollers Let Him Go (1945), Himes dealt with the social and psychological repercussions of being black in a white-dominated society. Beginning in 1953, Himes moved to Europe, where he lived as an expatriate in France and Spain. There, he met and was strongly influenced by Richard Wright. It was in France that he began his best-known series of crime novels—-including Cotton Comes to Harlem (1965) and Run Man Run (1966)—-featuring two Harlem policemen Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson. As with Himes’s earlier work, the series is characterized by violence and grisly, sardonic humor.

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thechronologicalsuperman:

Action Comics vol.1 #78 - Cover date November 1944
In this very unusual story - scripted by Alvin Schwartz, a writer of whom it might also fairly be said was an unusual man - Superman befriends the owner of a diner in the bohemian part of Metropolis, a colorful Russian character named Sergei who trades sandwiches and soup for artwork from his eccentric clientele, charges on a sliding scale, and deliberately keeps customers out so he never has to rush his cooking. We have similar places here in Seattle. 
Alvin Schwartz was an important figure in Superman’s history - a prolific contributor, he wrote Superman and Batman’s first teamup in World’s Finest and the first adult Bizarro story (Bizarro had debuted in an Otto Binder story for Superboy) complete with now-trademark speech patterns. Conflicts with editor Mort Weisinger drove Schwartz away from comics.
A deeply intelligent man, Schwartz had a temperament which made him an excellent fit for superhero comics - he was profoundly interested in Jungian psychoanalysis, Eastern mysticism, Wilhelm Reich’s theories of Orgone Energy, to name only a few of his many sidelines.
Following his departure from the comics, Schwartz claimed to have “met” Superman - or the tulpa of Superman, the idea of the character given physical form - in the very quotidian environment of a New York taxi cab.

Schwartz’s book about meeting his Superman tulpa, An Unlikely Prophet, is really interesting.

thechronologicalsuperman:

Action Comics vol.1 #78 - Cover date November 1944

In this very unusual story - scripted by Alvin Schwartz, a writer of whom it might also fairly be said was an unusual man - Superman befriends the owner of a diner in the bohemian part of Metropolis, a colorful Russian character named Sergei who trades sandwiches and soup for artwork from his eccentric clientele, charges on a sliding scale, and deliberately keeps customers out so he never has to rush his cooking. We have similar places here in Seattle. 

Alvin Schwartz was an important figure in Superman’s history - a prolific contributor, he wrote Superman and Batman’s first teamup in World’s Finest and the first adult Bizarro story (Bizarro had debuted in an Otto Binder story for Superboy) complete with now-trademark speech patterns. Conflicts with editor Mort Weisinger drove Schwartz away from comics.

A deeply intelligent man, Schwartz had a temperament which made him an excellent fit for superhero comics - he was profoundly interested in Jungian psychoanalysis, Eastern mysticism, Wilhelm Reich’s theories of Orgone Energy, to name only a few of his many sidelines.

Following his departure from the comics, Schwartz claimed to have “met” Superman - or the tulpa of Superman, the idea of the character given physical form - in the very quotidian environment of a New York taxi cab.

Schwartz’s book about meeting his Superman tulpa, An Unlikely Prophet, is really interesting.

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foreignmovieposters:

The Long Goodbye (1973). German poster.

I’ve never seen a The Long Goodbye poster that wasn’t excellent.

foreignmovieposters:

The Long Goodbye (1973). German poster.

I’ve never seen a The Long Goodbye poster that wasn’t excellent.

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